APS Bridge Program
2017 Graduate Education and Bridge Program Conference

2017 Joint Graduate Education and Bridge Program Conference

Thank you! The 2017 Joint Graduate Education and Bridge Program Conference was held February 10 - 12 at the College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center. This conference featured:

  • Plenary talks on Physics Graduate Education
  • Panels and discussions on diversity
  • Graduate student poster session
  • Networking opportunities
  • And much more

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Learn more about the APS Bridge Program

Learn more about previous conferences on Graduate Education

Questions?

Email bridgeprogram@aps.org

Agenda

View the Epitome

Friday, February 10, 2017

12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Registration Opens
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Poster Session: Graduate Education Programs
5:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Welcome Remarks from APS
Ted Hodapp, APS Director of Project Development
5:15 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Plenary I with Dinner: Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Liesl Folks, University at Buffalo; Newton Frateschi, University of Campinas; Anthony Johnson, University of Maryland-Baltimore County; Kathy McCormick, Department of Homeland Security; Steve Rolston, University of Maryland
Moderator: Ted Hodapp, APS
8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Optional Student Social Activity

Saturday, February 11, 2017

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
Registration
8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Plenary II with Breakfast: Findings on Graduate Admissions Studies
Casey Miller, Rochester Institute of Technology; Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
Moderator: Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Parallel Sessions
Workshop 1A Workshop 1B Workshop 1C
Enhancing Diversity Through Admissions Practices
Julie Posselt, University of Southern California; Casey Miller, Rochester Institute of Technology
Breaking the Myth of the "Non-Traditional" Physicist: The Real Story About Employment for Physics Graduates
Crystal Bailey, APS
Culturally Sensitive Mentoring
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan; Ximena Cid, California State University-Dominguez Hills, National Society of Hispanic Physicists; Michael Falk, Johns Hopkins University; Mel Sabella, Chicago State University
Moderator: Kathryne Sparks Woodle, APS
11:15 a.m.
Time Management and Work-Life Balance
Marquita Qualls, Entropia
12:00 p.m. - 12:05 p.m. Break
12:05 p.m. - 2:05 p.m. Plenary III with Lunch: Best Recruitment Practices
Lance Cooper, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Ramon Lopez, University of Texas-Arlington; Kate Scholberg, Duke University
Moderator: Ted Hodapp, APS
2:05 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. Break
2:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Parallel Sessions
Workshop 2A Workshop 2B Workshop 2C
Programmatic Innovations
Sheila Kannappan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Implicit Bias and Self Advocacy
Angela Johnson, St. Mary's College of Maryland
Mental Health in Physics Graduate School: Support Roles and Obligations of Faculty
Mercedes Ebanks, Howard University
3:15 p.m.
Institutional Change Tactics
Lance Cooper, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Scott Franklin, Rochester Institute of Technology; Jon Pelz, The Ohio State University; Chandra Turpen (Moderator), University of Maryland; Stuart Vogel, University of Maryland
Moderator: Chandra Turpin, UMD
Guided Reflection to Enable Persistence
Dimitri Dounas-Frazer, University of Colorado Boulder
Student-led Initiatives Toward Improving Graduate Student Mental Health
Gina Quan, University of Maryland; Zachary Eldredge, University of Maryland
4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Poster Set-up and Break
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Poster Session: Graduate Student Research
6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Plenary Session IV with Dinner: Reflections on the Future of Graduate Education in Physics
Cherry Murray, Harvard University
Moderator: Ted Hodapp, APS

Sunday, February 12, 2017

8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Plenary V with Breakfast: Nuts and Bolts of Bridge Programs
Jay Gupta, The Ohio State University, Kelly Holley-Bockleman, Vanderbilt University; Çagliyan Kurdak, University of Michigan; Alex Rudolph, California State Polytechnic University
Moderator: Erika Alexander Brown, APS
10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m. - 11:55 a.m. Parallel Sessions
Workshop 3A Workshop 3B Workshop 3C
Retention Best Practices
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan; Geraldine Cochran, Rutgers University; Casey Miller, Rochester Institute of Technology
Moderator: Monica Plisch, APS
Graduate Program Assessment
Simon Capstick, Florida State University, Michael Pechan, Miami University (Ohio); Talat Rahman, University of Central Florida
Moderator: Julie Posselt, USC
How to Create and Sustain a Physics Graduate Student Association
Sara Mueller, The Ohio State University; Adewale Akinfaderin, Florida State University; Ashlee Wilkins, University of Maryland
Moderator: Anashe Bandari, College of William and Mary
11:05 a.m.
New Developments in Graduate Core Courses
Alexandru Maries, University of Cincinnati; Chris Porter, The Ohio State University; Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh
How to Support a Physics Graduate Student Association
Garrett Matthews, University of South Florida; Jon Pelz, The Ohio State University
Moderator: Anashe Bandari, College of William and Mary
11:55 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Break
12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Report Out/Feedback with Lunch: What can Physics Societies do for you?
Ted Hodapp, APS Director of Project Development; Renee Horton, NASA, National Society for Black Physicists; Cathy O'Riordan, American Institute of Physics, Jesús Pando, DePaul University, National Society for Hispanic Physicists
Moderator: Monica Pilsch, APS
2:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. Closing Remarks and Wrap-up

Speakers

Adewale Akinfaderin, Florida State University

Adewale AkinfaderinAdewale Akinfaderin is a Ph.D. Candidate of Physics department and Graduate Research Assistant at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University (FSU). His research focuses on development of Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic field. He received his Bachelors in Applied Physics and Masters in Physics from the University of Lagos, Nigeria and North Carolina Central University respectively.

Adewale petitioned into the Congress of Graduate Students (COGS) as the College of Arts and Sciences Representative (summer 2013). He served as vice-chairperson and chairperson in the academic & student life (A&S) committee where he successfully created and executed pilot and large-scale surveys geared towards improving graduate students' experience at FSU. He also served as Deputy Speaker for COGS from 2014-15 where he acted as a public relation liaison between COGS, FSU and press domains. He was part of COGS budget committee and served as vice-chairperson of COGS Supplemental Allocation Council.

In 2014, Adewale founded Physics Graduate Student Association (PGSA), with the aim of addressing students' internal concerns while also providing resources to enhance their academic and professional interests. He leads board of executives in developing successful funding proposals, peer mentoring system and eclectic social and professional events. In 2015, FSU Physics department appointed Adewale as students' representative on Graduate Policy Review Sub-Committee. He is currently a Graduate Mentor for APS-FSU Bridge Program. He's a recipient of the Uhrhan Scholarship for Outstanding Students in Physics, Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities Award, FSU Seminole Torchbearers.

How to Create and Sustain a Physics Graduate Student Association
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Crystal Bailey, American Physical Society

Crystal BaileyDr. Crystal Bailey is the Careers Program Manager at American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, MD. Crystal works on several projects which are geared towards marketing physics and physics career information to high school students, undergraduates, graduate students and physics professionals. Some of her principle projects include the Physics InSight slideshow, Future of Physics Days Events for undergraduates at the APS annual meetings, the APS Job Board and Job Fair, APS Webinars, and maintaining resources on the APS Careers Website. She also devotes significant amounts of time to planning career workshops and other professional development related activities to support early-career physicists and helps manage the activities of the APS Committee on Careers and Professional Development.

Before coming to APS, Dr. Bailey did research in nuclear physics at Indiana University, Bloomington in the area of few-body systems. In 2008 she received the Konopinski Award for Outstanding Graduate Teaching from the IU Physics Department. She graduated with her Ph.D. from IU in 2009.

Breaking the Myth of the "Non-Traditional" Physicist: The Real Story About Employment for Physics Graduates
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Brian Beckford, University of Michigan

Brian BeckfordBrian Beckford grew up in Miami after moving from Jamaica, and was a graduate of the Design and Architecture Senior High (D.A.S.H). He was part of the second cohort of Ronald E. McNair Scholars at Florida International University and received his Bachelors of Science in Physics. Dr. Beckford later received his Master in Physics at Florida International University, and was awarded the College of Arts & Sciences, Outstanding Academic Achievement as Graduate Student in Physics. He was a recipient of the competitive Super Doctor Fellowship to study at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan and also was also awarded the Tohoku Kaihatsu Memorial Foundation Research Fellowship in 2011. Dr. Beckford earned a Ph.D. in nuclear physics from Tohoku University in 2013. His research interests are strangeness nuclear physics, primarily in the photoproduction of neutral kaon and lambda particles, physics beyond the standard model, and instrumentation.

Dr. Brian Beckford served as the Bridge Program project manager in the department of Education and Diversity for the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. The program focuses on increasing the number of physics Ph.D.s awarded to underrepresented minority (URM) students, including African American, Hispanic American, and Native American students.

Currently, Dr. Beckford is a research fellow at the University of Michigan as part of the K0TO experiment. The K0TO experiment, conducted at the J-PARC facility in Tokai Japan, is designed to measure the rare CP violating decay of a neutral long-lived kaon into a neutral pion and a neutrino anti-neutrino pair and provide a deeper understanding about why we live in a matter dominated universe. As a research fellow he has had the chance to serve as a mentor for undergraduate students in the research group. Additionally he is as an advisory board member for the University of Michigan's Bridges to Doctorate programs, a part of the Physics Coalition of Graduate Students and Groups (CGSG), and member of the physic's department newly formed Committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI).

Dr. Beckford is passionate about providing opportunities to people of color in STEM fields and is an advocate for diversity and inclusiveness in physics and astronomy. He is devoted to raising the awareness of impacts of stereotype threat, imposter syndrome, and systemized practices that have adverse effects on the participation and representation of people of color in the academy.

Culturally Sensitive Mentoring
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Retention Best Practices
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Ximena Cid, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Ximena CidXimena C. Cid received her bachelor's degree in Astrophysics from UC Berkeley and her Master's and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas, Arlington. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) where she conducts research in the physics education research (PER). She is a currently a board member of the National Society of Hispanic Physicists (NSHP), and a committee member for the Committee on Diversity for the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). Her current research focus is on exploring the relationship between visual spatial cognitive abilities and success in physics and the space sciences. Her other focus is on understanding population differences in PER. Growing up in a Chicanx/Indigenous political art-activist family, she also considers herself an advocate for diversity in higher education and is a promoter of STEAM.

Culturally Sensitive Mentoring
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Geraldine Cochran, Rutgers University

Geraldine CochranDr. Cochran is the current Dean of the Douglass Project for Rutgers Women in Science, Mathematics, & Engineering. Cochran earned her bachelor's degrees in physics and mathematics and her master's degree in teaching with a specialization in secondary school physics from Chicago State University. Cochran earned her Ed.S. and her Ph.D. in science education and curriculum and instruction with a cognate in physics, respectively, from Florida International University. Cochran has taught science, mathematics, and education courses at the elementary, high school, and collegiate levels for a variety of student populations including prospective, preservice, and in-service physics teachers. Cochran's research has been in the area of physics education.

Retention Best Practices
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Lance Cooper, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Lance CooperLance Cooper is Professor of Physics and Associate Head for Graduate Programs in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He has also been chair of the Illinois Department of Physics graduate admissions committee since 2003. As associate head, Lance has run a Physics Careers seminar series since 2012 to give physics graduate and undergraduate students insight into the diverse career options available to physics graduates. He has also overseen an increase in the percentage of women physics graduate students from 13% in 2010 to 23% in 2016. Lance is also on the Coordinating and Fellowship Selection Committees for the new Sloan Center for Exemplary Mentoring at Illinois, which aims to recruit and mentor 50 underrepresented Ph.D. students in STEM fields on campus. He obtained his B.S. in Physics from the University of Virginia, his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, and he served as a postdoc at AT&T Bell Laboratories before arriving at Illinois. He has been a Fellow of the American Physical Society since 2003 and he is currently serving as the Secretary-Treasurer for the APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics.

Best Recruitment Practices
Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:05 p.m.

Institutional Change Tactics
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Dimitri Dounas-Frazer, University of Colorado Boulder

Dimitri Dounas-FrazerDimitri Dounas-Frazer studies three aspects of physics laboratory coursework: (i) students' use of model-based reasoning while working on experimental physics tasks, (ii) instructors' beliefs and practices regarding teaching and learning laboratory skills, and (iii) classroom factors that support students in feeling ownership of their final projects. His research interests also include students' development of non-cognitive skills, like resilience to failure, through self-reflection and personalized feedback. In addition, Dr. Dounas-Frazer is an active member of local and national physics diversity initiatives in the United States. He earned his Ph.D. in 2012 from the University of California Berkeley, where he performed high-precision measurements of weak nuclear effects in atomic systems.

Guided Reflection to Enable Persistence
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Mercedes Ebanks, Howard University

Mercedes EbanksDr. Mercedes E. Ebanks is a graduate of Georgetown University (B.A. '94) and Howard University (M.Ed. '95, Ph.D. '05) with degrees in Counseling Psychology. Dr. Ebanks has an extensive background in education and mental health services and has served as a behavior specialist, school psychologist, and crisis counselor. Dr. Ebanks has worked with public, private, and alternative schools as well as social service organizations in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. She serves as the Coordinator of the Counseling Services Program and Associate Professor in the School of Education at Howard University. She prepares graduate students to work in school and community settings. Dr. Ebanks has co-authored several articles and her research interests include parent/caregiver-training programs, intervention techniques to motivate positive behaviors, and social emotional factors that contribute to educational productivity. She examines the problem of parental conflict and emphasizes Co-Parenting training. She discusses the importance of the father involvement.

Dr. Ebanks is co-founder and CFO of The MECCA Group (Mental Health Education Careers Consulting Assessments). The MECCA Group LLC is a psychological service agency that provides psychological and related services to individuals, families, schools and corporations. Dr. Ebanks is a Bilingual Clinician/Evaluator and Parent Coordinator. Her practical experiences are in applied behavior analysis to treat severe behavior disorders, clinical evaluations and treatment of childhood psychopathology, and psychoeducational evaluations for learning disabilities. She uses cultural assessments to develop strategies to improve individual well-being and strengthen family dynamics. Dr. Ebanks conducts workshops to educate parents on childhood development and professional development workshops to teach behavior modification techniques to address emotional disturbances and noncompliance.

Mental Health in Physics Graduate School: Support Roles and Obligations of Faculty
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Zachary Eldredge, University of Maryland

Zachary EldredgeZachary Eldredge is a third-year physics Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, originally from Oklahoma. He works on quantum information and many-body physics at the Joint Quantum Institute, and is active on the University of Maryland Physics Graduate Student Committee, where he advocates for mental health issues in academia.

Student-led Initiatives Toward Improving Graduate Student Mental Health
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Michael Falk, Johns Hopkins University

Michael FalkMichael Falk is a Professor at Johns Hopkins University who deploys computational methods to develop physical theories of non-equilibrium processes in materials. He served as chairperson of the APS ad-hoc Committee on LGBT Issues (C-LGBT) from 2014-2016, has served as a member-at-large for the Group on Statistical and Nonlinear Physics, and was a recipient of the APS Nicholas Metropolis Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics. He also leads an NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership with Baltimore City Schools, STEM Achievement in Baltimore Elementary Schools (SABES).

Culturally Sensitive Mentoring
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Liesl Folks, University at Buffalo

Liesl FolksLiesl Folks has been the dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University at Buffalo since 2012, and is a professor of Electrical Engineering. She holds a BSc (Hons) and a Ph.D., both in Physics, from The University of Western Australia, as well as an MBA from Cornell. Prior to joining UB in 2012, she spent 16 years in R & D in the magnetic data storage industry in Silicon Valley, working for IBM, Hitachi and Western Digital. Her research is in the fields of magnetic materials and devices, nanoscale metrology, and spin-electronic devices. She was the President of the IEEE Magnetics Society for 2013 - 2014.

Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:15 p.m.

Scott Franklin, Rochester Institute of Technology

Scott FranklinDr. Scott Franklin is professor of physics at Rochester Institute of Technology and director of RIT's CASTLE Center for Advancing STEM Teaching, Learning, and Evaluation. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin and then undertook an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in STEM Education at Dickinson College. His work as CASTLE director has involved a number of initiatives designed to foster sustainable institutional transformation. In 2010 he organized the formation of the Science and Mathematics Education Research Collaborative, an interdisciplinary team of STEM Education Researchers from within departments of physics, biology, chemistry, biomedical engineering and graphical communications. In 2011 he secured NSF funding to create the RIT Learning Assistant program that pairs undergraduates with faculty to implement active-engagement pedagogies in STEM classrooms; since 2014 the program has been funded internally, and is now a model for classroom transformation. His most recent initiative creates faculty triads to collaborate on transforming larger, multi-section foundational courses in physics and mathematics. In addition to program development, Dr. Franklin maintains active research labs in both soft condensed matter (granular materials) and, separately, physics education research.

Institutional Change Tactics
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Newton Frateschi, University of Campinas

Newton FrateschiProfessor Newton C. Frateschi has been serving as the Director of the "Gleb Wataghin" Physics Institute (IFGW), University of Campinas - UNICAMP - Brazil since 2014. He was the deputy director of this institute from 2010 to 2014. He was also the director of the Center for Semiconductor Components and Nanotechnologies - UNICAMP from 2005 to 2010. From 2001 to 2003, he worked as a senior optoelectronic designer at T-Networks Inc, Pennsylvania, USA, in the advanced photonic device technology group. He obtained his master's and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California and his bachelor's and master's degree in Physics from the IFGW - UNICAMP. He is a Brazilian National Research and Development Council (CNPq - Brasil) research fellow leading the device Research Laboratory (LPD - IFGW - UNICAMP) and the author and coauthor of over 100 scientific papers and several international patents primarily in the areas of optoelectronics and photonics.

Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:15 p.m.

Jay Gupta, The Ohio State University

Jay GuptaProfessor Gupta is co-director of the Ohio State Masters-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program and has helped in the transition to a more holistic approach in OSU Physics graduate admissions. His research interests are in the field of experimental condensed matter physics, and he mentors a group of about six Ph.D. students in this field. More specifically, his group studies how improved characterization and control of materials at the atomic scale can impact future computing and energy conversion technologies. On a personal note, Professor Gupta is an avid bicyclist and whistler.

Education
2004 Postdoctoral Fellow - IBM Almaden
2002 Ph.D. Physics UCSB
1996 B.S. Physics, UIUC
1996 B.S. Chemistry, UIUC

Awards
2007 Beckman foundation young investigator award
2007 NSF CAREER award
2007 ACIPA Outstanding young physicist award
2005 IBM Research Division award: spin-flip spectroscopy
2002 IBM Research Division award: molecule cascades

Nuts and Bolts of Bridge Programs
Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Theodore Hodapp, American Physical Society

Theodore HodappTheodore Hodapp is the Director of Project Development and Senior Advisor to the Department of Education and Diversity for the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. The APS Department of Education and Diversity runs programs that advocate issues relevant to minorities and women, and in areas of education and careers. Hodapp is also Principal Investigator of a large NSF and APS-funded national effort, the Physics Teacher Education Coalition, which seeks to improve the quality and quantity of physics and physical science K-12 teachers. Before coming to the APS, Hodapp served as Program Director in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, working with programs in curriculum development and implementation, teacher preparation, scholarships, and the National Science Digital Library (he is currently co-PI on the ComPADRE digital library project that is collecting physics education materials throughout the country).

Prior to coming to the NSF, Hodapp was professor and chair of the Hamline University Physics Department in St. Paul, Minnesota. He served as chair of the Physics and Astronomy Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His research interests include laser cooling, optical modeling, and physics education research.

Welcome Remarks from APS
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:00 p.m.

Report Out/Feedback with Lunch: What can Physics Societies do for you?
Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:00 p.m.

Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, Vanderbilt University

Kelly Holley-BockelmannKelly Holley-Bockelmann is an Associate Professor of Astronomy at Vanderbilt University, where she joined the faculty in 2007. She received her B.S. in Physics at Montana State University and her Ph.D. in Astronomy in 1999 at the University of Michigan. After her Ph.D., she did postdoctoral work at Case Western Reserve University and the University of Massachusetts. In 2004, she joined the Center for Gravitational Wave Physics at The Pennsylvania State University, where she became a big fan of gravitational waves and attended many talks on loop quantum gravity that left her scratching her head. Her main interests are in computational galaxy dynamics, black holes of all sorts, and gravitational waves. She is a recipient of a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation, is a Vanderbilt Chancellor Faculty Fellow, and her work has also been supported by NASA. Dr. Holley ­Bockelmann's research on growing supermassive black holes and rogue black holes have been featured in many online and print media outlets, though she still gets a bit nervous talking to the press.

As a first-generation college graduate within a family that sometimes lived below the poverty level, Dr. Holley-Bockelmann has a deep interest in broadening the participation of women, minorities, and first-generation college students in science. She is the Co-Director of the Fisk-to-Vanderbilt Master's-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program, which is designed to mentor a diverse cohort of graduate students to develop the skills needed to succeed as a Ph.D. scientist.

Nuts and Bolts of Bridge Programs
Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Renee Horton, NASA, National Society for Black Physicists

Renee HortonDr. Horton is an advocate for diversity and inclusion in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and works effortlessly in the community for STEM education and outreach. Dr. Horton believes that diversity and inclusion in the workforce provides a multi-dynamic talented group that will draw knowledge from their cultures, races, backgrounds and fundamental differences to achieve the most successful results for any organization. Dr. Horton is the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in Materials Science with a concentration in Physics from the University of Alabama, and an Electrical Engineering degree from Louisiana State University. Dr. Horton currently serves as the Space Launch System (SLS) Lead Metallic/Weld Engineer in the NASA Residential Management Office at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana. In her short career with NASA she has been awarded four group achievement awards. Dr. Horton was recently elected President of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP 2016) as the second woman to hold the office after Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson in 1983, 33 years previous. She has previously served on the program committee and as the chair of the Women in Physics Committee for NSBP.

Report Out/Feedback with Lunch: What can Physics Societies do for you?
Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:00 p.m.

Angela Johnson, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Angela JohnsonAngela Johnson is Professor of Educational Studies and Director of Teacher Education at St. Mary's College of Maryland. Johnson's research uses feminist, anthropological approaches in the study of girls and women of color in science. She teaches courses in educational equity, assessment, educational policy, and research methods. A former high school physics teacher, she has authored numerous articles and book chapters on the experiences of women of color in predominantly White science contexts and on other issues involving equity and excellence in science and science education.

Implicit Bias and Self Advocacy
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Anthony Johnson, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Anthony M. JohnsonAnthony M. Johnson has been the Director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR) and Professor of Physics and Computer Science & Electrical Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) since 2003. He received a B.S. in Physics (1975) from Polytechnic Institute of New York and a Ph.D. in Physics (1981) from City College of the City University of New York. His Ph.D. thesis research was conducted at AT&T Bell Laboratories with support from the Cooperative Research Fellowship Program for Minorities. He was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in the Photonic Circuits Research Department at Bell Labs where he spent 14 years before joining New Jersey Institute of Technology (1995), where he was Chairperson and Distinguished Professor of Physics until 2003.

Current research interests include the ultrafast photophysics and nonlinear optical properties of bulk, nanoscale, and quantum well semiconductor structures, ultrashort pulse propagation in fibers and high-speed lightwave systems. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Physical Society (APS) [94-97], the IEEE Photonics Society [93-95], the Optical Society of America (OSA) [93-96 & 00-03] and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) [02-08]. He served as 2002 President of the OSA; Editor-in-Chief of Optics Letters (95-01); member of the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [BESAC] (99-08); member of the NRC/NAS Committee on AMO2010: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (05-06); member (05-08) and Chair (09-10) of the IEEE Photonics Society Fellows Evaluation Committee; Deputy Director (06-16) of the NSF Engineering Research Center MIRTHE (Mid-Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment); member, APS Division of Laser Science (DLS) Executive Committee and Representative to APS Council (11-14); member, NRC Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (CAMOS) [13-15]; member APS Executive Board (13-14); member, APS Publication Oversight Committee (11-14); Founding Member of the Editorial Board of Physical Review X (11-18); member, APS Nominating Committee (16-18). He is a Fellow of the APS, OSA, IEEE, AAAS and the National Society of Black Physicists. Awards include the 1996 APS Edward Bouchet Award and CCNY Honorary Doctorate (June 2011).

Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:15 p.m.

Sheila Kannappan, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Sheila KannappanSheila Kannappan is an Associate Professor of astrophysics and the Associate Chair for Diversity in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Since 2013 she has played a driving role in redesigning many aspects of the graduate program in her department -- including recruiting, admissions, advising, and curriculum and exam structure -- as part of a broader mission of supporting and promoting equity, inclusion, and diversity. Recently, Kannappan led UNC's successful application to become an APS Bridge Partnership Institution. Her shared leadership philosophy has greatly expanded the number of department members at all levels involved in activities ranging from mentoring to social events to diversity advocacy. Kannappan has previous experience as an REU program director and a 9th grade public school teacher through Teach For America.

Programmatic Innovations
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Çagliyan Kurdak, University of Michigan

Çagliyan KurdakÇagliyan Kurdak received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, in 1988, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, in 1995. He joined the faculty with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1998, after working as a post-doctoral scientist at the Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests include the study of electrical properties of low-dimensional electron systems. Prof. Kurdak is currently serving as the Director of the Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, and he is the founder of the Imes-Moore Fellowship Program, a bridge program designed to prepare students for doctoral studies in Applied Physics.

Nuts and Bolts of Bridge Programs
Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Ramon Lopez, University of Texas at Arlington

Ramon LopezRamon E. Lopez received his B.S. in Physics in 1980 from the University of Illinois, and his Ph.D. in Space Physics in 1986 from Rice University. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) where he leads a research group that is working in both space physics and science education. He is also a Co-Director for the UTA UTeach teacher preparation program. His current research focuses solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and factors that lead to successful performance in university physics. Dr. Lopez is the author or co-author of over 110 peer-reviewed publications, as well as the popular science book "Storms from the Sun." Dr. Lopez has won numerous awards for his work in both space physics and science education, including the 2002 APS Nicholson Medal, the 2010 SACNAS Distinguished Scientist Award, the 2012 APS Edward A. Bouchet Award, and two NASA Group Achievements Awards. Dr. Lopez is a Fellow of the APS and of the AAAS.

Best Recruitment Practices
Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:05 p.m.

Alexandru Maries, University of Cincinnati

Alexandru MariesAlexandru Maries is an Assistant Professor-Educator in the Department of Physics at the University of Cincinnati. He received a Ph.D. from University of Pittsburgh specializing in physics education research with a focus on the use of multiple representations in physics problem solving. He has also done research focusing on the effectiveness of graduate courses and the professional development of graduate teaching assistants. At University of Cincinnati, in addition to teaching and research, he is overseeing the TA training program for all graduate teaching assistants each term.

New Developments in Graduate Core Courses
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Kathy McCormick, Department of Homeland Security

Kathy McCormickKathy McCormick is a physical scientist with the Department of Homeland Security. She received her Ph.D. in physics from Old Dominion University (1999), performing her thesis research at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. After graduation, she was a visiting researcher in France at the Service de Physique Nucléaire, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique. Upon her return to the U.S., she was a postdoctoral associate at Kent State University and Rutgers University, then in 2004, Dr. McCormick joined the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a Senior Research Scientist. In 2008, Kathy was detailed to the Laboratories and Scientific Services Directorate of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and became a federal employee soon thereafter. At CBP, she is a subject matter expert in the area of radiological and nuclear detection and interdiction, and received the Department of Homeland Security Secretary's Award for Excellence in 2015 for work in optimizing CBP's radiation detection capabilities. In 2014 she began to serve on the APS Committee on Careers and Professional Development, and served as the chair of the Committee in 2016.

Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:15 p.m.

Casey Miller, Rochester Institute of Technology

Casey MillerCasey W. Miller is an Associate Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he is Director of the Materials Science and Engineering program. He is an experimental physicist focusing on nanoscale magnetic materials and related devices. He served as Director of the University of South Florida's APS Bridge Site, which was created by the American Physical Society in 2013. He graduated summa cum laude from Wittenberg University in 1999 with University and Physics Departmental Honors, where he was also elected to FBK. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2003, earning the Physics Department's Best Dissertation Award for work combining Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Scanning Probe Microscopy. His post-doctoral work at the University of California, San Diego, focused on spintronics. He is recipient of the prestigious NSF-CAREER and AFOSR-Young Investigator Awards.

Findings on Graduate Admissions Studies
Saturday, February 11, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Enhancing Diversity Through Admissions Practices
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Retention Best Practices
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Sara Mueller, The Ohio State University

Sara MuellerSara Mueller is a fourth-year graduate student at The Ohio State University. She studies atomic defects in semiconductors and physics graduate retention. As the President of OSU's Society for Women in Physics (SWiP), Sara co-organized the midwest site APS 2016 Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics. She has served on OSU Department of Physics' Graduate Studies Committee and on the department's Physics Graduate Student Council. Sara is passionate about justice-issues in physics and after graduation she plans to pursue a career in academia.

How to Create and Sustain a Physics Graduate Student Association
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Cherry Murray, Harvard University

Cherry MurrayDr. Cherry Murray was confirmed by the Senate December 10, 2015 and sworn in December 18, 2015 as the Director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Dr. Murray oversees research in the areas of advanced scientific computing, basic energy sciences, biological and environmental sciences, fusion energy sciences, high energy physics, and nuclear physics. She has responsibility not only for supporting scientific research, but also for the development, construction, and operation of unique, open-access scientific user facilities. The Office of Science manages 10 of the Department's 17 National Laboratories.

Dr. Murray served as dean of Harvard University's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences from July 1, 2009 until December 31, 2014. She also holds Harvard's Benjamin Peirce Professorship of Technology and Public Policy, and Professor of Physics. Dr. Murray served as Principal Associate Director for Science and Technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2007 to 2009 and as Deputy Director for Science and Technology from 2004 to 2007.

Dr. Murray held a number of positions at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, formerly AT&T Bell Laboratories and previously Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. from 1978 to 2004. She began as a Member of Technical Staff within the Physical Research Laboratory and eventually finished her tenure as Senior Vice President for Physical Sciences and Wireless Research.

Dr. Murray was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and the National Academy of Engineering in 2002. She served as president of the American Physical Society in 2009. Dr. Murray was appointed to the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling in 2010. She served on the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories in 2014. She was also awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation by the White House in 2014 for contributions to the advancement of devices for telecommunications, the use of light for studying matter, and for leadership in the development of the STEM workforce in the United States. Dr. Murray received a B.S. and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

On January 17, 2017, Dr. Murray will return to Harvard University as the Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy and Professor of Physics.

Reflections on the Future of Graduate Education in Physics
Saturday, February 11, 2017 6:00 p.m.

Catherine O'Riordan, American Institute of Physics

Catherine O'RiordanCatherine O'Riordan is the Chief Operating Officer of the American Institute of Physics. In her role she oversees all outreach programs at AIP, including the Society of Physics Students (SPS) and other programs in education. AIP also hosts job boards, career resources for the physical sciences, and GradschoolShopper.com, the graduate program directory for physics and related fields. O'Riordan worked previously at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington, D.C., where she managed ocean research and education programs including marine geoscience training programs for teachers and outreach programs to K-12 students. From 1999-2007 she managed public affairs and education programs at the American Geophysical Union.

O'Riordan's research interests are in fluid mechanics and oceanography. She holds a B.S. from Case Western Reserve University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Environmental Fluid Mechanics (Civil Engineering) from Stanford University. She has served on many committees including the Chesapeake Bay Science and Technology Advisory Committee, the steering committee for the Marine Geosciences Leadership Symposium, review panels for NSF and on the NSF-EHR Committee of Visitors for minority programs.

Report Out/Feedback with Lunch: What can Physics Societies do for you?
Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:00 p.m.

Jesús Pando, DePaul University

Jesús PandoDr. Pando earned his Ph.D. under Prof. Li-Zhi Fang at the University of Arizona. His thesis centered on the development of the wavelet transform for use in the study of large-scale structure. He received the Chateaubriand post-doctoral, followed by an NSF international post-doctoral fellowship to continue his work at the Observatoire de Strasbourg, France.

In general, his research focuses on the uncovering of structure from a noisy background. Originally, he focused the formation of large-scale structure formation in the universe, using higher order correlations to uncover the clustering patterns of matter in the universe. Along with continuing to study large-scale structure, he is also now investigating secondary structure detection and prediction in proteins.

Dr. Pando has long been involved in efforts to increase the number of underrepresented groups in the sciences. He has been a member of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) for 15 years and is a board member of the National Society of Hispanic Physicists. He has served on numerous committees and panels dealing with the issues faced by underrepresented students and professionals in STEM fields.

Dr. Pando currently serves as the chair of the Physics Department at DePaul University.

Report Out/Feedback with Lunch: What can Physics Societies do for you?
Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:00 p.m.

Michael Pechan, Miami University (Ohio)

Michael PechanDr. Michael Pechan was professor of Physics at Miami University (Ohio) from 1981 to 2014, where he served as Department Chair from 2001 to 2012. His research has focused on condensed matter magnetism, beginning with doctoral work doing neutron scattering in rare earth materials and culminating with magnetodynamics and magnetostatics in nanoscale and spintronic materials utilizing magnetic resonance techniques. These activities had longstanding support from the U.S. Department of Energy, resulting in 56 journal articles and 28 MS theses.

Dr. Pechan had visiting scientist appointments at Ames Lab, University of Illinois Champaign/Urbana, Argonne National Lab and UC San Diego. He served on the Editorial Board and Steering Committee for the Magnetism and Materials Conference and on the Executive Committee for the APS topical subgroup GMAG.

He currently manages the Experimental Condensed Matter Physics program in the Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences at the U.S. Department of Energy.

Education:
B.S., Physics and Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, Platteville
Ph.D., Physics, Iowa State University

Graduate Program Assessment
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Jon Pelz, The Ohio State University

Jon PelzJon Pelz received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1987. After postdoctoral research at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Pelz joined the Ohio State University faculty in 1990. Pelz’ experimental condensed matter physics research focusses on nanometer-scale electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of surfaces, interfaces, and device structures, primarily using scanned probe techniques and electronic modelling. His group has also developed equipment and techniques for imaging and understanding electronic traps in technologically important wide band gap semiconductor materials and devices. Pelz is currently the Vice Chair of Graduate Studies and Research in the Ohio State University Physics Department, and is co-leader of Ohio State’s M.S-to-Ph.D. Physics Bridge Program.

Institutional Change Tactics
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

How to Support a Physics Graduate Student Association
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Monica Plisch, American Physical Society

Monica PlischMonica Plisch serves as the Director of Education and Diversity at the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. She is a co-PI on the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) project and a member of the National Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics. She also leads initiatives to improve mentoring and ethics education and to develop high school lessons on contemporary physics.

Before coming to the APS, Plisch led education programs at a NSF funded center at Cornell University, where she developed programs on nanotechnology for undergraduate students and physics teachers. Plisch completed her doctoral studies in physics (nanomagnetics) at Cornell University. She enjoys competitive rowing and running.

Retention Best Practices
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Chris Porter, The Ohio State University

Chris PorterChris Porter is a post-doctoral researcher in Physics Education Research, and an academic mentor with the Ohio State University Physics M.S. – Ph. D. Bridge Program, in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Porter and the entire OSU Physics Bridge Program share the APS goals of increasing the number of advanced degrees awarded to members of underrepresented minorities, and improving the quality of graduate physics education in general.

Prior to joining the OSU bridge program, Dr. Porter was a Visiting Professor of Physics at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, and a Visiting Researcher at Trinity College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland. He has also worked in the private sector on educational materials, at one point serving as a Director of Digital Content for McGraw Hill Education.

Dr. Porter obtained an undergraduate degree from Universitaet Leipzig, in Leipzig, Germany, and received his Ph. D. from the Ohio State University in Condensed Matter Theory. His interests include frustrated magnetic systems such as diluted magnetic semiconductors and adatoms on graphene, and physics education research, particularly in the area of graduate education.

Dr. Porter is married to Nicole Hoefer (a notable biochemist) and the couple has two brilliant daughters.

New Developments in Graduate Core Courses
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Julie Posselt, University of Southern California

Julie PosseltJulie Posselt is Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Southern California and a National Academy of Education/ Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow. Her research examines organizational behavior affecting access to and equity in selective sectors of higher education, especially graduate education, elite colleges and universities, STEM, and the professoriate. Posselt is the author of Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping (Harvard University Press, 2015), an award-winning ethnographic comparative study of faculty decision making in doctoral admissions. Her research is also published in the American Educational Research Journal, Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and Chronicle of Higher Education, among others. She is a member of the editorial review board for the Journal of Higher Education and Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, and her work has been funded by the US Department of Education, Spencer Foundation, National Science Foundation, and others.

Enhancing Diversity Through Admissions Practices
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Geoff Potvin, Florida International University

Geoff PotvinGeoff Potvin completed his doctorate in theoretical physics at the University of Toronto before taking up a science education postdoctorate in the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. Prior to coming to FIU in January 2014, he spent five years as a faculty member in the Department of Engineering & Science Education at Clemson University. He has served on the APS Forum on Education's Executive Committee and the American Association of Physics Teachers' Committee on Diversity. His research is focused on understanding diversity issues in the physical sciences and engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Using an identity lens, he studies how educational practices and other experiences influence students' attitudes and career intentions, especially for those who are traditionally marginalized from STEM. He is working with the APS Bridge Program to understand how departmental admissions and retention practices can help to grow a more diverse body of future physicists, and the factors that affect student success in graduate physics.

Findings on Graduate Admissions Studies
Saturday, February 11, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Marquita M. Qualls, Ph.D., Entropia Consulting

Marquita M. QuallsMarquita M. Qualls, Ph.D. is a chemist by training, but a true leader at heart. With over 20 years of leadership experience in consulting, coaching, and motivating people in a range of leadership and professional development areas, Dr. Qualls possesses the rare combination of strong technical ability and impressive soft skills. As a scientist, she has a gift for listening to what's not being said and asking probing questions to arrive at solutions. Her technical side drives an ability to gather perspectives and analyze feedback, while at the same time connecting with people and guiding them towards achieving results. This has enabled her to function and make seamless transitions between the scientific and non-technical worlds.

Dr. Qualls holds a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Tennessee State University and Purdue University, respectively. She founded Entropia Consulting, a small management consulting firm with expertise in the areas of Leadership and Professional Development to assist individuals and organizations achieve their full potential.

Time Management and Work-Life Balance
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Gina Quan, University of Maryland

Gina QuanGina Quan is a fifth year graduate student at the University of Maryland, College Park Campus in the Physics Education Research Group. Her research focuses on developing inclusive learning spaces which support community building and reflection, and studying identity development within these spaces. At UMD, she has worked on the development, teaching, and research of two classrooms: an Arduino-based summer camp for high school girls and a research seminar for physics undergraduates. Within these spaces, her goals are to foster identity development and contest typical university models of weeding out students by supporting alternative pathways to success in physics. She is a co-founder of the Access Network, a national network of STEM inclusivity programs at eight universities.

Student-led Initiatives Toward Improving Graduate Student Mental Health
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Talat Rahman, University of Central Florida

Talat RahmanTalat Rahman is a Pegasus Professor and Distinguished Professor of Physics at University of Central Florida. Her research interests focus in computational design of functional nanomaterials through microscopic understanding of their physical and chemical properties. A related interest is in multiscale modeling of chemical reactions and thin film growth processes. Apart from using density functional theory (DFT) based methods as her workhorse, her group also works on techniques that go beyond DFT. Her research is funded through grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Vacuum Society, and recipient of several professional awards including the Research Incentive Award from UCF, Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize, Higuchi Research Award from the University of Kansas, and the Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award, Kansas State University. She is engaged in establishing research initiatives in developing countries such as Pakistan. She has published over 250 articles in high impact journals and mentored a large number of Ph.D. students. She has been engaged nationally and internationally in efforts to promote the participation of women and minorities (particularly through the Bridge Program of American Physical Society) in STEM disciplines. She is also involved in pedagogical reforms in the teaching of physics and in the recruitment and training of students for careers in teaching through the APS PhysTEC program. She is chair of the APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications (GERA) and member, executive committee, Surface Science Division, American Vacuum Society. She also serves on the Executive Editorial Board of Journal of Physics Condensed Matter and of Progress in Surface Science.

Graduate Program Assessment
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Steven Rolston, University of Maryland

Steven RolstonSteven Rolston is the Chair of the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland and the Co-director of the Joint Quantum Institute, a joint venture between the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Rolston has served on numerous APS committees and is currently the Chair of the APS Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. Prior to joining the University of Maryland in 2003, he was a staff scientist at NIST for 15 years. His research interests include quantum information and simulation, ultracold atomic and plasma physics, and optical fiber technology. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Preparing Students for Private Sector Employment
Friday, February 10, 2017 5:15 p.m.

Alexander Rudolph, California State Polytechnic University

Alexander RudolphDr. Alexander Rudolph is Professor of Physics and Astronomy at California State Polytechnic University (Cal Poly Pomona), where he has been on the faculty since 2005. He received his bachelor's degree from Haverford College in 1982, and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago in 1988. Before joining the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona, he worked as a faculty research associate at the University of Maryland, a National Research Council Fellow at NASA/Ames Research Center, and was on the faculty of the Harvey Mudd College Physics Department from 1994-2001. He also spent a year teaching high school science and math.

Dr. Rudolph is a national leader in promoting the participation of under-represented minority (URM) students and women in physics and astronomy. He is Director of the CAMPARE program, and co-Director of the CSU-UC Ph.D. bridge program, Cal-Bridge, two programs whose shared mission is to advance undergraduate astronomy research and education among traditionally underrepresented groups (including women and underrepresented minority students) in order to promote their participation and advancement, and increase their numbers in Ph.D. programs, in physics, astronomy, and related fields.

Nuts and Bolts of Bridge Programs
Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:00 a.m.

Mel Sabella, Chicago State University

Mel SabellaMel Sabella is a Professor of Physics at Chicago State University. He earned his Ph.D. in Physics Education Research from the University of Maryland before beginning his postdoc work with the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. His research interests focus on improving STEM education for underrepresented students by identifying and leveraging the resources, strengths and culture of this community. Sabella is a PI on a collaborative NSF grant that focuses on the Learning Assistant (LA) Model. He is the Co-PI on an NSF S-STEM Project that provides different types of support for Chemistry and Physics majors.

He has published papers in the Physics Teacher magazine, the Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings, the Physics Education Research Supplement to the AJP, the Effective Practices in Preservice Physics Teacher Education: Recruitment, Retention, and Preparation book, and the Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education. He is a current member of the AAPT Committee on Diversity and the Physics Education Leadership Organizing Council and has previously served on the APS Committee on Minorities, the APS Forum on Education, and the AAPT Committee in Physics Education Research. He co-organized the PER Conference which focused on Diversity in PER in 2008, and in 2014 he co-organized the Gordon Research Conference: Physics Research and Education. He is heavily involved in the LA Alliance and has hosted two regional LA Workshops and has assisted in the International LA Workshops.

Culturally Sensitive Mentoring
Saturday, February 11, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Kate Scholberg, Duke University

Kate ScholbergKate Scholberg is Professor of Physics and Bass Fellow at Duke University. She received her B.Sc. in Physics from McGill University in 1989. She then attended Caltech, receiving an M.S. in 1991 and a Ph.D. in 1997 for thesis research on the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy. As a research associate at Boston University, she joined the Super-Kamiokande collaboration. She was Assistant Professor at MIT from 2000-2004 before moving to Duke University. A recipient of the DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator and NSF CAREER awards, she is currently a member of the Super-Kamiokande and T2K collaborations and serves on the Executive Committee of the DUNE collaboration. She is spokesperson of the COHERENT experiment, which does neutrino physics at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. She coordinates the SuperNova Early Warning System, an international network of supernova neutrino detectors. She was elected as an APS Fellow in 2013. Her recent service to the community includes HEPAP (2007-2010), Member at Large of the APS Division of Particles and Fields Executive Committee (2010-2012), Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (2013-2014), and the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (2014-2016). She is currently Chair of the APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics and serves as the APS Division of Particles and Fields Secretary/Treasurer.

Best Recruitment Practices
Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:05 p.m.

Chandralekha Singh, University of Pittsburgh

Chandralekha SinghChandralekha Singh is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Founding Director of the Discipline-based Science Education Research Center (dB-SERC) at the University of Pittsburgh. She obtained her Ph.D. in theoretical condensed matter physics from the University of California Santa Barbara and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, before joining the University of Pittsburgh. She has been conducting research in physics education for two decades. She is a pioneer in conducting educational research related to the teaching and learning of quantum mechanics. She held the chair-line of the American Physical Society Forum on Education from 2009-2013 and was the chair of the editorial board of Physical Review Special Topics Physics Education Research from 2010-2013. She has co-organized two physics education research conferences in 2006 and 2007 and was the co-chair of the 2010 Gordon Conference on Physics Research and Education. She co-chaired the first conference which brought together physicists, chemists and engineers from various engineering departments to discuss the future of materials education in 2008. She was the co-organizer of the first conference on graduate education in physics in 2008 and chaired the second conference on graduate education in physics in 2013. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and American Association of Physics Teacher. She is a team leader of the US delegation to the 6th International Conference on Women in Physics in Birmingham, UK in 2017. For more information, visit her website.

New Developments in Graduate Core Courses
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Chandra Turpen, University of Maryland

Chandra TurpenChandra Turpen is a Research Assistant Professor in the Physics Department with the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Maryland, College Park. Chandra also directs the Maryland Learning Assistant Program and is an active leader, "LAgent," within the National Learning Assistant Alliance. Her research agenda focuses on modeling 1) change and development and 2) the ways in which instructional contexts shape (and are shaped by) participants. These central themes inform her work in understanding how to best foster organizational change, faculty learning, and student learning. Chandra pursues projects that have high potential for leveraging equitable change in undergraduate STEM programs and she makes these struggles for change a direct focus of her research efforts. As a core organizer of the Access Network and Physics Allies, she also co-works with faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students across the country towards a vision of a more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and accessible physics community.

Institutional Change Tactics
Saturday, February 11, 2017 2:15 p.m.

Ashlee Wilkins, University of Maryland

Ashlee WilkinsAshlee N. Wilkins is a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Maryland, College Park Department of Astronomy. For her dissertation, Ashlee studies the atmospheres of hot, giant planets around other stars with the Hubble Space Telescope. She did her undergraduate work in physics and English at Cornell University. As a graduate student, Ashlee helped found, then led, and now advises the GRAD-MAP physics and astronomy diversity initiative, a graduate-student-powered initiative that connects students and faculty at the University of Maryland with their counterparts at area minority-serving institutions and community college to better improve the climate for and representation of under-represented minorities in graduate programs in physics and astronomy.

How to Create and Sustain a Physics Graduate Student Association
Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:15 a.m.

Registration

Registration is now closed. The deadline was January 20, 2017.

*Please note: There will not be any on-site registration accepted.*

Cancellations: Cancellations must be received in writing by Tuesday, January 10, 2017.

Rates

Member Type Rate
Non-Member $395
Bridge Member $250
Student $45


Note: Speakers, panelists, students, and participants registering from Bridge Program Member Institutions should use the promo codes they received via email to receive above rates.

Registration fees will cover:

  • Participation in all conference workshops and sessions
  • Breakfast (Saturday and Sunday), Lunch (Saturday and Sunday), and Dinner (Friday and Saturday)
  • Coffee breaks
  • Conference materials

Abstract Submission

View the Epitome

Presentation of a poster provides an opportunity for effective one-to-one communication. The longer presentation time of the poster session enables you to present a more in-depth description and discussion of your work.

To make a successful poster presentation:

  1. Put your poster up at least 1/2 hour prior to the start of the poster session.
  2. Your poster must correspond to the title and content of the abstract you submitted.
  3. Your poster must be designed to fit within the confines of a 44" high x 91" wide posterboard, and consist of materials that can be mounted easily with push pins.
  4. Plan your poster to be in logical sequence, i.e. introduction, study design and methods, data collected, conclusion.
  5. Posters should be designed for clear viewing from a distance of beyond 3' so that they can be viewed by a number of people at the same time.
  6. To ensure visual effectiveness of your poster, use large lettering and a minimum of text.
  7. Use of color can visually enhance your poster.
  8. Remove your poster immediately at the close of the poster session.

Hotel

College Park Marriott

The College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center is located near the University of Maryland, College Park, with easy access to the Washington, D.C. area.

Reservations are now closed.

Conference Group Rate: $119 USD per night

* Rates apply for booked stays between February 9, 2017 and February 11, 2017

Speakers and those approved for travel funding should make their own travel arrangements. APS will reimburse the hotel room rate and taxes for the duration of the conference. Incidental charges will not be covered.

Travel

Student Travel Funding

Student travel applications are now closed.

2016 Bridge Fellows at CSULB, FSU, IU, OSU, UCF, USF, will have their travel covered by their program, and thus are ineligible for travel funding. If you are not covered and will need travel funding assistance, you may apply for travel funding from the Bridge Program. Please note that preference will be given to 2016 Bridge Students whose travel is not covered by their own departments.

Once you complete your registration form and submit payment, a link to the travel funding application will be sent to the email address supplied on the registration form. You must use this emailed application link to apply for travel funding. Please do not share this link with anyone else. Student travel applications are now closed.

Applications will be reviewed by the APS Bridge Program Staff. If approved, you will be reimbursed up to $500 for your transportation to and from the Grad Ed-BP conference. You will be notified by December 16, 2016 about the status of your application. If approved, you should make your travel arrangements to attend the Conference and save your receipts, which will be necessary for reimbursement.

Travel to College Park, MD

Reagan National Airport (DCA)

Hotel direction: 15 miles SW

  • Alternate transportation: Excellent Green Ride; fee: $55.00 USD (one way)
  • Estimated taxi fare: $60.00 USD (one way)

DCA Taxi & Shuttle Information

Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)

Hotel direction: 30 miles S

  • Alternate transportation: Excellent Green Ride; fee: $65.00 USD (one way); reservation required
  • Bus service, fee: $65.00 USD (one way)
  • Estimated taxi fare: $65.00 USD (one way)

BWI Taxi & Shuttle Information

Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD)

Hotel direction: 50 miles W

  • Alternate transportation: Excellent Green Ride; fee: $80.00 USD (one way); reservation required
  • Estimated taxi fare: $80.00 USD (one way)

IAD Taxi & Shuttle Information

Driving

Complimentary on-site parking.

College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

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