APS Bridge Program

APS National Mentoring Community & Bridge Program Conference

October 9-11, 2015
Florida International University
Miami, Florida

APS National Mentoring Community & Bridge Program Conference

The annual APS Bridge Program meeting was held jointly with the newly formed National Mentoring Community (NMC).

Over 175 people joined us at Florida International University in Miami to improve their mentor relationships, to learn how to build a successful bridge program, and to hear from the students, faculty, and administrators who lead and support these programs.

Session and workshop topics included:

  • Mentor Research
  • Mentor and Mentee Training
  • Components of Bridge Programs
  • Grad School Admissions
  • Career Development
  • And More

Questions? Please email bridgeprogram@aps.org or nmc@aps.org.

Undergraduate & Graduate Poster Session

View Abstracts

Post-Conference Survey

Please take some time to fill out the post-conference survey. We appreciate your valuable feedback.

About the National Mentoring Community

The National Mentoring Community is a new APS initiative to increase the number of underrepresented minority (URM) students that obtain physics degrees by connecting undergraduate students with faculty mentors. Learn more about NMC and sign-up to become a mentor on the APS website.

Agenda

Friday, October 9, 2015

Beginning of National Mentoring Community Meeting
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Registration
2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Faculty Research Tours for Undergraduate Mentees
(Full description of tours)
Dr. Walter Van Hamme, Dr. Tigran Abrahamyan, Astroscience Tour
Dr. Angela Laird and Dr. Rob Laird, Cognitive Neuroscience Tour
Dr. Hebin Li, Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics Tour
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Graduate Student Panel: Life as a Grad Student/Transition from Undergraduate to Graduate Life
Rafael Badui, Florida International University
Zahra Hooshmand, University of Central Florida
Orlando Olivas-Gomez, FIU
5:00 p.m. Welcome Reception
5:45 p.m. Welcome & Introduction to the APS NMC Program
Suzanna Rose, Executive Director of the School of Integrated Sciences and Humanities, FIU
Laird Kramer, Director, STEM Transformation Institute, FIU
Theodore Hodapp, APS Director of Education & Diversity
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Introduction to the NMC
Theodore Hodapp, APS Director of Education & Diversity
7:15 p.m. Plenary: What Does Access Really Mean?
Mary James, Reed College
8:30 p.m. Student Social Activity

Saturday, October 10, 2015

7:30 a.m.
First Bus Departs Hotel
8:00 a.m.
Last Bus Departs Hotel
8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

9:00 a.m. Plenary: Research on Mentoring
Richard Reddick, UT Austin
10:00 a.m. Break
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Parallel Sessions:
Research Mentor Training
Monica Plisch, APS Associate Director of Education & Diversity
Theodore Hodapp, APS Director of Education & Diversity
Research Mentee Training
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan
Arlene Modeste Knowles, APS Diversity Programs Manager
12:00 p.m. - 12:45 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Parallel Sessions:
Providing Professional Development to Mentees
Vivian Incera, UTEP
Eduardo Mucciolo, UCF
Willie Rockward, Morehouse
Undergraduate Career Options
Crystal Bailey, APS Careers Manager
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Parallel Sessions:
Panel: Differing Mentoring Styles
Pete Markowitz, FIU
Diola Bagayoko, Southern University
Talat Rahman, UCF
Workshop on Reflections and Goal Setting for Undergraduate Students
Dmitri Dounaz-Frazer, UC Boulder
Ana Aceves, Boston University
3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Poster Set-up
3:45 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Reception & Poster Session: Student Research Poster Session with Judging Prizes
View Abstracts
Beginning of Bridge Program Meeting
5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Dinner with Poster Prize Awards
Nadya Mason, UIUC and Chair, APS Committee on Minorities
Plenary: Increasing Diversity by Changing the Culture of the Academy
Joseph Brown, Stanford University
8:00 p.m. Social Event

Sunday, October 11, 2015

7:30 a.m.
First Bus Departs Hotel
8:00 a.m.
Last Bus Departs Hotel
8:00 a.m.
Working Breakfast: Discussions About Improving Networking/Conference Logistics
Arlene Modeste Knowles, APS Career & Diversity Administrator
9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Parallel Sessions:
Building a Mentoring Team
Chris Porter, OSU
Dina Myers Stroud, Vanderbilt
Philip Kutzko, University of Iowa
Panel: Peer Mentoring
Thiago Szymanski, FSU
Brian Casas, USF
Michael Cross, USF
10:30 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Discussion: Role of Graduate Students and Postdocs in Mentoring
Moderator: Casey Miller, RIT
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Working Lunch: Feedback Discussion About NMC Programming Effectiveness
Kathryne Woodle, APS Education & Diversity Programs Manager
Arlene Modeste Knowles, APS Career & Diversity Administrator
End of National Mentoring Community Meeting
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Optional Professional Development Activity for Students
1:15 p.m. Bus Departs FIU for Hotel (for participants not attending the Bridge Meeting)
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Plenary Discussion: What is the Bridge Program and Bridge Program Best Practices
Brian Beckford, University of Michigan
Ted Hodapp, APS Director of Education & Diversity
2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Parallel Sessions:
Institutional Change: How to Sustain Educational Change
Çagliyan Kurdak, University of Michigan
Ken Furton, Provost, FIU
Talat Rahman, UCF
Nuts and Bolts for Bridge Programs: Key Components and Practical Elements
Dina Myers Stroud, Vanderbilt
Simon Capstick, FSU
Brittany Kamai, Vanderbilt
Graduate Career Options
Crystal Bailey, APS
3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Plenary: Lessons from the Florida Education Fund's Programs to Build a Diverse Graduate Population
Lawrence Morehouse, Florida Education Fund
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Plenary & Interactive Discussion: Reflections on Graduate Admissions: Current and Future Directions
Geoff Potvin, Florida International University
5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Plenary & Interactive Discussion: Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping
Julie Posselt, Univerity of Michigan
6:00 p.m. - 6:45 p.m. Closing Remarks & Wine Reception
End of Bridge Program Meeting

Plenary Speakers

Brian Beckford, University of Michigan

Brian BeckfordBrian Beckford is a first generation college graduate and a strong advocate for inclusiveness in physics and astronomy. Beckford graduated from Florida International University (FIU) in 2005 and was a recipient of a Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Scholarship. In 2008, he earned a Master's degree in physics from FIU. Beckford received his Ph.D. in nuclear physics at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan under the Super Doctor Fellowship. His doctoral studies focused on strangeness nuclear physics, primarily on the photoproduction of neutral kaons and Λ, as well as hypernuclear physics.

Beckford is especially invested in providing opportunities to people of color in STEM fields through his recent work as the Bridge Program Manager in the Education and Diversity Department of the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. The program focuses on increasing the number of physics PhDs earned by underrepresented minority (URM) students, including African American, Hispanic American, and Native American students.

Brian Beckford is currently a research fellow in the department of physics at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is currently working on the KOTO experiment, which is designed to measure the rare CP violating decay of neutral Kaons. The experiment is performed at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (JPARC) in Tokai, Japan. In his current appointment, Beckford continues to be engaged in diversity issues.

Research Mentee Training
Saturday, October 10, 2015 10:30 a.m.

What is the Bridge Program and Bridge Program Best Practices
Sunday, October 11, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Joseph Brown, Stanford University

Joseph BrownJoseph Brown is a first-gen student and Army brat who grew up in San Antonio, TX. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Southwest Texas State University and an Sc.M. degree in biomedical engineering from Brown University. He received his PhD in psychology from Stanford in 2000. His graduate work focused on the influence of stereotypes and prejudice on the intellectual identities and performance of women and minorities. Since January 2003 he has been the Graduate Diversity Recruitment Officer for the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University and in June of 2014 also joined the Diversity & First-Gen Office in Student Affairs. He has also lectured in the department of psychology.

Increasing Diversity by Changing the Culture of the Academy
Saturday, October 10, 2015 6:30 p.m.

Theodore Hodapp, APS Director of Education & Diversity

HodappTheodore Hodapp is the Director of Education and Diversity for the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. The APS Department of Education and Diversity runs programs that advocate issues relevant to minorities and women, and in areas of education and careers. Hodapp is also Principal Investigator of a large NSF and APS-funded national effort, the Physics Teacher Education Coalition, which seeks to improve the quality and quantity of physics and physical science K-12 teachers.

Before coming to the APS, Hodapp served as Program Director in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, working with programs in curriculum development and implementation, teacher preparation, scholarships, and the National Science Digital Library (he is currently co-PI on the ComPADRE digital library project that is collecting physics education materials throughout the country).

Prior to coming to the NSF, Hodapp was professor and chair of the Hamline University Physics Department in St. Paul, Minnesota. He served as chair of the Physics and Astronomy Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His research interests include laser cooling, optical modeling, and physics education research.

Welcome & Introduction to the APS NMC Program
Friday, October 9, 2015 5:45 p.m.

Introduction to the NMC
Friday, October 9, 2015 7:00 p.m.

Research Mentor Training
Saturday, October 10, 2015 10:30 a.m.

What is the Bridge Program and Bridge Program Best Practices
Sunday, October 11, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Mary James, Reed College

Mary James

Mary James is the Dean for Institutional Diversity and the A. A. Knowlton Professor of Physics at Reed College. Her principal areas of physics research have been in accelerator physics and astrophysics. As part of her duties as Dean, Professor James oversees Reed's new Center for Teaching and Learning that supports faculty at all career stages as they develop new curriculum and pedagogical initiatives. Among the goals of the Center is to encourage faculty to investigate and integrate best practices in their disciplines to attract and retain women, first generation students, and students of color in the STEM majors at Reed. Professor James has served on and chaired the Committee on Minorities for the American Physical Society. The committee's work focuses on helping Physics Departments create strong mentoring programs and supportive department climates, particularly for women and students from racial and ethic groups underrepresented in physics. James received her B.A. in physics from Hampshire College and her Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

What Does Access Really Mean?
Friday, October 9, 2015 7:15 p.m.

Lawrence Morehouse, Florida Education Fund

Lawrence MorehouseDr. Lawrence Morehouse is President and CEO of the Florida Education Fund and an Associate Professor (currently on leave) in the Department of Government and International Affairs at the University of South Florida. Dr. Morehouse has a wealth of experience which includes teaching in higher education, developing educational policy, publishing, conference presentations, speaking engagements, and numerous TV and radio appearances. Dr. Morehouse has also develop and taught courses at Cornell University, Louisiana State University, and New College.

Because of his outstanding academic performance, Dr. Morehouse has been awarded numerous fellowships and scholarships. He also has received several outstanding teaching awards as well as published several book chapters and refereed journal articles and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Interdisciplinary Research.

Under Dr. Morehouse's leadership, the FEF has expanded the innovative educational programs it conducts for underrepresented students throughout the State of Florida. These programs generally fall into two distinct categories - pre-college and doctoral fellowships.

For the FEF's pre-college component, Dr. Morehouse and staff have created a highly acclaimed state-wide academic enrichment program to help students improve their skills in mathematics, writing, and reading. As a result of these efforts, pre-college students participating in these programs have received more than $32 million in scholarships from Florida colleges and universities.

At the doctoral level, during Dr. Morehouse's tenure, the McKnight Doctoral Fellowship program has tripled the number of fellowships offered annually and expanded its support system to include the publication of the FEF Journal of Interdisciplinary Research, Professor Editorial Services, Dissertation Fellowships, Conference Participation Grants, Online Graduate Writing Workshops, a Midyear Research and Writing Conference, and a Summer Research and Writing Institute for advanced graduate students and junior faculty. The FEF has raised over $63,000,000 million for its doctoral programs while also growing its endowment through Dr. Morehouse's leadership. During his tenure as CEO of the FEF, Dr. Morehouse has been the Principle or Co-Principle Investigator on grants from the College Board Partnership, Fifth Third Bank Foundation, Bank of America Foundation, Regions Bank, Helios Foundation, Duckwall Foundation, Opa-locka Community Development Corporation, Inc., Tampa Housing Authority, Hillsborough County School District, and the Florida Department of Education. Dr. Morehouse has been in the forefront of educational reform, having served on the One Florida Accountability Commission, the Florida Constitutional Revision Commission, the Florida Board of Education Accountability Commission, the Governor's Access and Diversity Commission, and Boards of The Education Channel, Tampa Bay United Way, the Tampa Chamber of Commerce, and the Museum of Science and Industry. He currently serves on the College Board's Southern Regional Council and The Florida Department of Education Student Growth Implementation Committee.

Dr. Morehouse earned his Bachelor's Degree from Southern University and his Masters and Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Lessons from the Florida Education Fund's Programs to Build a Diverse Graduate Population
Sunday, October 11, 2015 3:30 p.m.

Julie Posselt, University of Michigan

Julie PosseltJulie Posselt is an Assistant Professor in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education at the University of Michigan and a National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellow. Posselt's research is aimed understanding and mitigating institutionalized inequalities in higher education. Her current research examines the implications of status competitions and faculty decision making for student access, attainment, and wellbeing. Having worked for four years with the McNair Scholars Program, she has strong interests in research methods and graduate education. Posselt is author of Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping (2015, Harvard University Press), and other work has been published in American Educational Research Journal, Research in Higher Education, Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, among others.

Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping
Sunday, October 9, 2015 5:00 p.m.

Geoff Potvin, Florida International University

Geoff PotvinGeoff Potvin completed his doctorate in theoretical physics at the University of Toronto before taking up a science education postdoctorate in the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. Prior to coming to FIU in January 2014, he spent five years as a faculty member in the Department of Engineering & Science Education at Clemson University. He is a member of the APS Forum on Education's Executive Committee and the American Association of Physics Teachers' Committee on Diversity. His research is focused on understanding diversity issues in the physical sciences and engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Using an identity lens, he studies how educational practices and other experiences influence students' attitudes and career intentions, especially for those who are traditionally marginalized from STEM. He is working with the APS Bridge Program to understand how departmental admissions and retention practices can help to grow a more diverse body of future physicists, and the factors that affect student success in graduate physics.

Plenary & Interactive Discussion: Reflections on Graduate Admissions: Current and Future Directions
Sunday, October 9, 2015 4:00 p.m.

Richard Reddick, University of Texas at Austin

ReddickDr. Richard J. Reddick is an award-winning Associate Professor in Educational Administration, with courtesy appointments in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies, and the Warfield Center of African and African American Studies. Dr. Reddick is also the Faculty Director for Campus Diversity Initiatives in the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, the Assistant Director of the Plan II Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts, and serves as a faculty fellow in the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis, all at The University of Texas at Austin.

His research focuses on several areas: the experiences of Black faculty and faculty of color at predominantly White institutions; mentoring and developmental relationships between faculty and Black students; and work-life balance in academia. Reddick's research has been published in the American Educational Research Journal (AERJ) and Harvard Educational Review (HER), featured on NPR and the Associated Press, and he has contributed over 50 scholarly articles, chapters, and entries, including four co-authored and co-edited scholarly volumes. Dr. Reddick is also active in national research associations, most notably the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE).

Dr. Reddick holds a master's and doctorate in higher education from Harvard University, and a bachelor's from The University of Texas at Austin. He is married and the father of two children, serves on the boards of two public charter schools, and is actively engaged in organizations focused on improving the quality of life for citizens of color in Austin, Texas. A game show maven, Dr. Reddick is also a former Jeopardy! champion and Wheel of Fortune College Week champion.

Mentor Ability and Mentorability: Bringing Together Mentors and Protégés in Fulfilling Developmental Relationships
Saturday, October 10, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Speakers

Ana Aceves, Boston University

Ana AcevesAna Aceves is a graduate student at Boston University working towards her Masters' in Science Journalism. She aspires to increase scientific knowledge among Spanish-speakers in the US by creating science content for them in Spanish.

Ana is a first-generation college student originally from California and the eldest child of immigrant parents. In May 2015 she completed her Bachelors' degrees from UC Berkeley. As an undergrad, she was a student leader of the diversity-oriented Berkeley Compass Project. There she was part of the mentoring program and paired with Dimitri Dounas-Frazer. Their relationship has extended past their time at UC Berkeley and they are now co-facilitating this workshop!

Workshop on Reflections and Goal Setting for Undergraduate Students
Saturday, October 10, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Rafael Badui, Florida International University

Graduate Student Panel: Life as a Grad Student/Transition from Undergraduate to Graduate Life
Friday, October 9, 2015 4:00 p.m.

Diola Bagayoko, Southern University

Differing Mentoring Styles
Saturday, October 10, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Crystal Bailey, APS Careers Manager

Crystal BaileyDr. Crystal Bailey is the Careers Program Manager at the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, MD. Crystal works on several projects which are geared towards marketing physics and physics career information to high school students, undergraduates, graduate students and physics professionals. Some of her principle projects include the Physics InSight slideshow, Future of Physics Days Events for undergraduates at the APS annual meetings, the APS Job Board and Job Fair, APS Webinars, and maintaining resources on the APS Careers Website. She also devotes significant amounts of time to planning career workshops and other professional development related activities to support early-career physicists and helps manage the activities of the APS Committee on Careers and Professional Development.

Before coming to the APS, Dr. Bailey did research in nuclear physics at Indiana University, Bloomington in the area of few-body systems. In 2008 she received the Konopinski Award for Outstanding Graduate Teaching from the IU Physics Department. She graduated with her PhD from IU in 2009.

Undergraduate Career Options
Saturday, October 10, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Graduate Career Options
Sunday, October 11, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Simon Capstick, FSU

Simon Capstick

Simon Capstick is a Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Physics at the Florida State University (FSU). He received his BSc in physics from the University of Guelph in Canada, and his PhD from the University of Toronto. He was a researcher at Carnegie Mellon University and Jefferson Laboratory before joining the faculty at Florida State. His research is in the area of theoretical hadron physics, primarily the study of excited states of baryons like the proton. He is part of a team of faculty that started in 2008 a program to teach introductory physics courses at FSU based on the SCALE-UP approach pioneered at North Carolina State University. Along with his FSU Physics colleague Steven Hill, he has worked to increase the size and diversity of FSU's physics graduate program, which has resulted in a doubling of the number of women in the program over the last five years, and a recent sharp increase in the number of under-represented minority graduate students with strong support from the APS Bridge Program and FSU.

Nuts and Bolts for Bridge Programs: Key Components and Practical Elements
Sunday, October 11, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Brian Casas, University of California Irvine

Brian CasasBrian Casas earned his B.S. in physics from Rutgers University in New Brunswick New Jersey in the spring of 2013. He was recruited to the graduate program at the University of South Florida through the APS Bridge program during the inaugural year. After two years under the direction of Dr. Hari Srikanth and Dr. Manh-Huong Phan, Brian earned a Master in Physics studying exotic frozen electron dynamics in strongly correlated systems. Brian will be pursuing his PhD in physics at the University of California Irvine beginning in the Fall of 2015.

Due to his recruitment to USF through the Bridge Program, Brian acted as an APS Bridge Fellow, in an unofficial capacity. This experience, coupled with his experiences as a full time graduate student allowed him unique insight into the roles of mentoring and community in a graduate program. Brian acted as a peer mentor coordinator from the fall of 2014 through the summer of 2015. These responsibilities included: matching incoming Bridge Students with graduate mentors, acting as a line of communication to the department and to the local Bridge Program, as well as mentoring the 4 bridge fellows.

Panel: Peer Mentoring
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Michael Cross, USF

Michael Cross

Mr. Cross is a doctoral candidate in the physics department at the University of South Florida. He has a B.S. in computer science from the University of Texas at San Antonio (2005). His present research is an interdisciplinary collaboration focused on 3D bioprinting platforms and biomaterials for rapid cell release. His interests are translating scientific advances in the lab into useful commercial applications in medicine. Previously he worked in e-commerce with 10+ years in fortune 500 companies (financial and retail services) managing cross-functional teams, corporate projects, and business strategy for technology integration.

He is a recipient of the LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate (2010), USF Provost's Award for Outstanding by a Teaching Assistant in STEM (2014), and the McKnight Dissertation Fellowship (2015). He has served in various mentoring capacities both for organizations and individuals alike.

Panel: Peer Mentoring
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Dmitri Dounaz-Frazer, University of Colorado Boulder

Dmitri Dounaz-FrazerDr. Dounas-Frazer is a Research Associate in the Physics Education Research group at University of Colorado Boulder. His research focuses on studying and improving upper-division physics lab courses, and his activism focuses on increasing diversity in the sciences by supporting the persistence of students from underrepresented groups. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley in 2012, where he performed high-precision measurements of atomic parity violation in ytterbium while also playing a leadership role in the diversity-oriented Berkeley Compass Project. Dr. Dounas-Frazer is a member of CU-Prime, a student-run organization that promotes equity and inclusion in the Boulder Physics Department. He is also a leader of the Access Network, a coalition of programs similar to (and including) Compass and CU-Prime at institutions across the country.

Workshop on Reflections and Goal Setting for Undergraduate Students
Saturday, October 10, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Ken Furton, Provost, FIU

Institutional Change: How to Sustain Educational Change
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Zahra Hooshmand, University of Central Florida

Graduate Student Panel: Life as a Grad Student/Transition from Undergraduate to Graduate Life
Friday, October 9, 2015 4:00 p.m.

Vivian Incera, UTEP

Vivian InceraVivian Incera is a Professor of Physics and the Dr. C. Sharp Cook Chair in Physics at the University of Texas at El Paso. She received her BS in Physics from Havana University, Cuba, in 1976 and a PhD in Theoretical Physics from the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow, Russia, in 1988. After a postdoctoral appointment at the Lebedev Institute, she immigrated to the U.S. and in 1993 was appointed as Assistant Professor at SUNY-Fredonia, where she was later on tenured and promoted to Associate and Full Professor. In 2005, she was recruited as the Physics Chair at Western Illinois University. In 2009, she was appointed as the new Chair of the Physics Department at the University of Texas at El Paso. Under her leadership the UTEP physics department experienced a deep transformation that led to significant improvement in research funding and faculty productivity, the development of new concentrations and programs, and a jump in the physics majors' enrollment from 15 to over 110. During the six and a half years she has spent at UTEP, she has been actively involved in developing initiatives to foster the success of underrepresented students in physics. This past December, she stepped down from her Chair position to focus her efforts on her research and mentoring projects, as well as on growing an innovative physics bridge program that she developed in collaboration with various research institutions. This bridge initiative has already placed several UTEP physics graduates in competitive Physics PhD programs across the nation.

Providing Professional Development to Mentees
Saturday, October 10, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Brittany Kamai, Vanderbilt University

Brittany KamaiBrittany is a PhD student in Physics at Vanderbilt University. Currently, she is an active graduate student at the Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. Brittany is a National Academy of Sciences Ford Fellow, a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and Fermilab Universities Research Association Scholar. Her research is on the Fermilab Holometer, an experiment designed to test whether a fundamental description of space-time has large scale measurable effects. Brittany received her Bachelor's degree at the University of Hawaii and her Master's from Fisk University. As a Fisk-Vanderbilt Bridge Program Fellow, she gained valuable skills to become an integral part of the Fermilab Holometer team.

Nuts and Bolts for Bridge Programs: Key Components and Practical Elements
Sunday, October 11, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Laird Kramer, Director, STEM Transformation Institute, FIU

Welcome & Introduction to the APS NMC Program
Friday, October 9, 2015 5:45 p.m.

Çagliyan Kurdak, University of Michigan

Cagliyan Kurdak

Çagliyan Kurdak received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, in 1988, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, in 1995. He joined the faculty with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1998, after working as a post-doctoral scientist at the Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests include the study of electrical properties of low-dimensional electron systems. Prof. Kurdak is currently serving as the Director of the Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, and he is the founder of the Imes-Moore Fellowship Program, a bridge program designed to prepare students for doctoral studies in Applied Physics.

Institutional Change: How to Sustain Educational Change
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Philip Kutzko, University of Iowa

Building a Mentoring Team
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Angela Laird, FIU

Angela LairdAngela Laird is an Associate Professor of Physics at Florida International University in Miami, Florida. She received a B.S. in Physics from Florida State University (1998), and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2002). She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Research Imaging Institute of the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio (UTHSCSA; 2003-2004), and served on the UTHSCSA faculty in the Department of Radiology (2004-2012). Dr. Laird's research focuses on computational cognitive neuroimaging, which uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to understand the organization of large-scale networks in the human brain. Her work focuses on developing novel data analysis algorithms, neuroscience informatics tools, and neuroimaging ontologies to yield analytic strategies for improving investigations into functional brain networks of healthy individuals, as well as in populations with psychiatric and neurologic diseases and disorders. Her research is funded by awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Pete Markowitz, FIU

Differing Mentoring Styles
Saturday, October 10, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Nadya Mason, UIUC and Chair, APS Committee on Minorities

Poster Prize Awards
Saturday, October 10, 2015 6:30 p.m.

Casey Miller, RIT

Discussion: Role of Graduate Students and Postdocs in Mentoring
Sunday, October 11, 2015 11:00 a.m.

Arlene Modeste Knowles, APS Diversity Programs Manager

Arlene Modeste KnowlesArlene Modeste Knowles is the Career and Diversity Administrator at the American Physical Society. She serves as the manager of the APS Scholarships for Minority Undergraduate Physics Majors, is in the Program Management Group of the APS Bridge Program, and manages most other diversity programs for the APS. In her capacity as the career administrator at APS, Knowles has organized and moderated career panels and tutorials at APS meetings, managed the APS job fairs and online career center, and worked on other career specific programs.

Before coming to APS, Knowles received her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development from Cornell University, on a pre-medical track. While at APS, Knowles first focused on programs aimed at recruiting and retaining minorities in physics, and later began working on programs to build awareness of career opportunities for all members of the physics community. Today, she works more exclusively on diversity initiatives, which include programs and activities that address the recruitment, retention, mentoring and careers of underrepresented groups.

Research Mentee Training
Saturday, October 10, 2015 10:30 a.m.

Eduardo Mucciolo, UCF

Eduardo MuccioloDr. Eduardo Mucciolo has been in the UCF faculty since 2003. Previously he had faculty appointments at PUC in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and at Duke University. He has a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, all in Physics. His areas of expertise are theoretical condensed matter physics and quantum information science. His current research interests involve quantum error correction and the development and use of quantum-inspired algorithms to solve combinatorial problems. He also collaborates with colleagues at UCF and elsewhere to study charge and spin transport in low-dimensional materials. At UCF, he has coordinated the Physics graduate program, mentored and supervised students, and implemented new studio-based teaching methodologies for introductory physics courses.

Providing Professional Development to Mentees
Saturday, October 10, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Orlando Olivas-Gomez, Florida International University

Orlando Olivas-GomezOrlando Olivas-Gomez is currently a research assistant working at the Florida International University's Applied Research Center. He conducts research for the Department of Energy Environmental Management whose focus is primarily on the decommission and decontamination of nuclear sites located throughout the United States. He is also a Ronald E. McNair fellow and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Scholar.

Orlando obtained his B.S. degrees in physics from Florida International University in Spring 2015. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in physics at Florida International University.

Graduate Student Panel: Life as a Grad Student/Transition from Undergraduate to Graduate Life
Friday, October 9, 2015 4:00 p.m.

Galen Pickett, California State University Long Beach

Galen PickettGalen Pickett is a member of the faculty of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at California State University Long Beach since 1999. He has a BS in physics from MIT (1989) and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago (1995). He is a soft-matter theorist, with interests in self-organizing polymer and membrane systems. He has been the director of the undergraduate program since 2003, has been deeply involved in the Long Beach PhysTEC and Bridge projects, and has been working on equity issues in higher education since 2006 in the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program enterprise at Long Beach.

Building a Mentoring Team
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Monica Plisch, APS Associate Director of Education & Diversity

Plisch Monica Plisch serves as the Associate Director of Education and Diversity at the American Physical Society (APS) in College Park, Maryland. She is a co-PI on the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) project and a member of the National Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics. She also leads initiatives to improve mentoring and ethics education and to develop high school lessons on contemporary physics.

Before coming to the APS, Plisch led education programs at a NSF funded center at Cornell University, where she developed programs on nanotechnology for undergraduate students and physics teachers. Plisch completed her doctoral studies in physics (nanomagnetics) at Cornell University. She enjoys competitive rowing and running

Research Mentor Training
Saturday, October 10, 2015 10:30 a.m.

Chris Porter, Ohio State University

Chris PorterChris Porter is a post-doctoral researcher in Physics Education Research, and an academic mentor with the Ohio State University Physics M.S. - Ph. D. Bridge Program, in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Porter and the entire OSU Physics Bridge Program share the APS goals of increasing the number of advanced degrees awarded to members of underrepresented minorities, and improving the quality of graduate physics education in general.

Prior to joining the OSU bridge program, Dr. Porter was a Visiting Professor of Physics at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, and a Visiting Researcher at Trinity College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland.

Dr. Porter obtained an undergraduate degree from Universitaet Leipzig, in Leipzig, Germany, and received his Ph. D. from the Ohio State University in Condensed Matter Theory. His interests include frustrated magnetic systems such as diluted magnetic semiconductors and adatoms on graphene, and physics education research, particularly in the area of graduate education.

Building a Mentoring Team
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Talat Rahman, University of Central Florida

Talat RahmanTalat Rahman is Pegasus Professor and Chair of Physics at the University of Central Florida. After completing her undergraduate education in Pakistan (Karachi University and Islamabad University) she came to the US as graduate student and received her PhD in Physics from University of Rochester. She served as a University Distinguished Professor of Physics at Kansas State University before joining UCF in September 2006 as a Distinguished Professor and Chair of Physics. She was named Pegasus Professor at UCF in 2012.

Dr. Rahman's research interests focus in the development of theoretical and computational frameworks for understanding characteristics of phenomena such as chemical reactivity and selectivity as controlled by the local environment on complex surfaces, nanoparticles, and two-dimensional materials. Her work also engages multi-scale modeling for simulating epitaxial growth and surface morphological evolution. Predictive modeling of magnetic and optical properties of nanomaterials is also her forte. Her work is funded through grants from the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Rahman is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) with over 250 articles published in high impact journals. She is also the recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize (2000), Higuchi Research Award from the University of Kansas (2002), and Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award from Kansas State University (1998).

She is a mentor to a diverse group of graduate students and postdoctoral associates and has mentored over two dozen PhD students. At Kansas State University she helped establish a program (Developing Scholars) for enhancing the retention and graduation rates of students from historically underrepresented groups. She is also engaged in pedagogical reforms in the teaching of introductory physics course, a project for which she has funding from the National Science Foundation. She is the site leader for a PhysTEC Comprehensive grant from the APS, which aims to increase the number of physics majors who seek careers in education. She is also the site leader for the APS Bridge Program at UCF, an effort to increase the number of physics PhDs awarded to underrepresented minority (URM) students, including African American, Hispanic American, and Native American students.

Dr. Rahman is engaged in establishing research initiatives in several developing countries. From 1998 to 2011 she helped organize a workshop on Nanoscience and Condensed Matter Physics at the annual International Nathiagali Summer College, in Pakistan, which was started by Nobel Laureate Professor Abdus Salam.

Differing Mentoring Styles
Saturday, October 10, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Institutional Change: How to Sustain Educational Change
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Willie Rockward, Morehouse

Providing Professional Development to Mentees
Saturday, October 10, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Suzanna Rose, FIU

Welcome & Introduction to the APS NMC Program
Friday, October 9, 2015 5:45 p.m.

Dina Myers Stroud, Vanderbilt University

Dina Myers StroudDina Myers Stroud is the Executive Director of the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master's to PhD Bridge Program and Research Assistant Professor in the Departments of Physics and Astronomy and Medicine at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Stroud provides direct student mentoring support, organizes professional development activities, oversees the day-to-day operations of the Fisk-Vanderbilt Bridge Program and maintains an active research program in cardiovascular genetics. Dr. Stroud received B.A. degrees in Zoology/Genetics and Women's Studies from Ohio Wesleyan University and earned her PhD in Molecular Biology from Vanderbilt. After post-doctoral fellowships at UCLA and NYU, Dina returned to Vanderbilt as a Research Instructor in 2007. She joined the Fisk-Vanderbilt Executive Team in 2012.

Building a Mentoring Team
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.

Nuts and Bolts for Bridge Programs: Key Components and Practical Elements
Sunday, October 11, 2015 2:00 p.m.

Thiago Szymanski, Florida State University

Thiago SzymanskiI was born in São Paulo, Brazil where I lived for twelve years before moving with my family to Michigan. As an undergraduate, I attended Michigan State University for a Bachelor's of Science in Physics. At Michigan State, I was incredibly fortunate to mentor underrepresented minority (URM) students in the STEM field through the Charles Drew Science Scholars program. I was also fortunate enough to be involved with organizations such as the Ronald E. McNair Scholars and MI-LSAMP, which further support URM students in higher education.

My passion for research and mentoring ultimately led me to pursue my Ph.D. in Physics at Florida State University. My research interests lie within experimental condensed matter physics, and I currently work under Dr. Steve Hill at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in the EMR division. I am also a student mentor for the APS Bridge Program at Florida State.

Panel: Peer Mentoring
Sunday, October 11, 2015 9:00 a.m.